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Instagram profil: @harvard_business_review – Savjeti direktno sa Harvarda

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Harvard su završili Al Gore, Mark Zuckerberg, Natalie Portman, kao i mnoge druge poznate ličnosti koje postavljaju trendove u poslovnom svijetu. Istraživački instituti sa vrhunskom tehnologijom, kao i odličan nastavni kadar razlozi su zbog kojih je ovaj univerzitet jedan od najboljih na svijetu.

Zahvaljujući poznatoj platformi za dijeljenje fotografija, sada imate priliku pročitati savjete koje stručnjaci Harvarda dijele, kako svojim studentima, tako i pratiocima na Instagram-u. Svaka objava kreirana od strane @harvard_business_review je prava “riznica mudrosti” iz svijeta menadžmenta, marketinga i preduzetništva. 

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Smartphones give us greater discretion over when and where to work and how we stay connected with others. At the same time, this constant connection extends the length of our workdays and reduces our ability to detach, potentially harming our work engagement as well as our time at home. So if you want to use your phone less, first figure out why. Research shows that when we understand the motivation behind our unwanted behaviors, we’re more likely to find strategies that will help us successfully change them. . Swipe through the images above to learn about four key motivations and strategies. Which is right for you? — Adapted from “If You Want to Use Your Phone Less, First Figure Out Why,” by Marcello Russo ET AL.

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Artificial intelligence seems to be on the brink of a boom. It’s guiding decisions on everything from crop harvests to bank loans. Totally automated customer service is on the horizon. Yet companies are struggling to scale up their AI efforts. Why? There are organizational and cultural barriers AI initiatives face. To lower them, companies need to shift workers away from traditional mindsets, like relying on top-down decision-making, which often run counter to those needed for AI. They also need to convey an AI project’s urgency and benefits; invest heavily in AI education and adoption; and account for the company’s AI maturity, business complexity, and innovation pace when deciding how work should be organized. . This is just one of the features in our July-August issue, which is live on our website today. Take a look at our story for other favorites, including articles on Marvel Studios, grief at work, white collar crime, and being a working parent. Happy reading! — Adapted from “Building the AI-Powered Organization,” by Tim Fountaine ET AL.

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Sooner or later, every technology transitions from an elite niche to a mainstream tool. AI is now undergoing a similar transformation. We’re entering an age in which just about anyone can leverage the power of intelligent algorithms to solve the problems that matter most to them. In other words, we’re entering the age of deployed AI — and its most important asset is the vision that guides engineering expertise. What problems can AI solve, and what kind of data might the solution require? By what metrics will success be measured? And how can the result be integrated most effectively with the people and processes already in place in any given business? These are broad, organizational questions, and their answers won’t come from any single stakeholder. Every voice can contribute to deployed AI — technical and nontechnical alike — and it’s vital that businesses establish workflows that empower everyone to play a role. Adapted from "When AI Becomes an Everyday Technology," by Andrew Moore. Artist credit: JOHN LAMB/GETTY IMAGES

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Do you tend to take notes on your laptop or on a piece of paper? Over the years, notebooks and pens have been replaced with laptops and touch-screens in most meetings. And sure, you can take quicker notes when typing, but is that necessarily better? According to a 2014 study conducted by researchers from Princeton and UCLA, the answer is no — it's not. It turns out that, when you only use a laptop to take notes, you don’t absorb new materials as well. That’s largely because typing notes encourages verbatim, or mindless transcription. Writing notes in your own words, rather than directly transcribing a PowerPoint, helps you better process what is being said and improves your sense of recall. So in the next meeting you attend, try to ditch your digital ways and bring a pen and spiral notebook. Your memory may thank you. — Adapted from "What You Miss When You Take Notes on Your Laptop," by Maggy McGloin. Artist credit: BS-PHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

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Do you think you, or someone you love, will be able to find a job after college? The good news: In comparison to past years, today’s entry-level labor market looks solid. People who graduate into a strong labor market will earn more throughout their careers than those who graduate during a recession. And when a recession eventually does hit, people with college degrees are more protected. The less good news: Recent grads are more likely to be underemployed in jobs that don’t require a college degree today than between 1998 and 2003. Also, median earnings for recent grads were no higher in 2018 than they were in 2000 and 1990, and earnings inequality among recent grads has actually increased in that time. Together, that means that the bottom quarter of recent grads make less today than they have in the past. —
Still, confidence among recent grads is high. They’re interested in pursuing fulfilling careers — not just financially lucrative ones — and are increasingly pursuing creative passions and social service work over higher-paying, possibly lower-risk jobs. What advice do you have for today’s graduates as they enter the job market? —
Adapted from "What the Job Market Looks Like for Today’s College Graduates," by Jed Kolko. Artist credit: HBR STAFF/MB PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES

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